Monday, February 20, 2017

Misc. Monday

I have to say February has certainly been an eventful month so far. A couple weeks ago it started snowing. And it didn't stop. For four days we were inundated with the white stuff. Given that we live in a place that panics if two inches of snow falls, you can't imagine what it was like when over two feet of snow came down! Of course, I was in my element. It was stunningly beautiful, and brought back so many memories of childhood winters on our family's farm in Idaho, and also memories of the years we spent in the Kootenays when my children were young.




There are a few downsides to being buried in snow though, especially if you are a wiener dog. Poor Jenny. The snow was many times higher than she is. In fact, it was even higher than Fergus, but unlike Jenny he loves the snow. I just had to be sure I got up early enough each morning to shovel a path for them to walk on. By the end of Snowmageddon 2017 we had run out of places to put the snow as we shovelled it. You can see from the picture our wall of snow was almost higher than my husband's car.



The snow event was followed by an ice storm. Ice storms are a regular occurrence in parts of Ontario and Quebec. They are almost unheard of in British Columbia. It was a thing of both beauty and destruction. The morning after the storm we woke up to a world coated in ice. Literally everything outdoors looked like the top two pictures. Quite predictably we lost our power. My morning started by lantern light and finished the same way. The strangest part of the ice storm wasn't the actual ice though. It was the sound of branches "exploding" as the weight of all that ice became too much to bear. You can see an example of the destruction in the bottom picture.




Given that I've been snowbound and icebound for much of the past couple weeks there's been lots of knitting happening. Okay, there's always lots of knitting happening, so I guess I should say more than the usual amount of knitting has occurred. The thing is, I hardly have any pictures to share. My Coast Salish vest from the knitting retreat I attended last fall is done. Except for the zipper. So no picture there. My skirt from Sylvia Olsen's book Knitting Stories is finally finished. It's been washed and blocked, and is now drying. So the only picture I have of that is the one above where I am sewing the waistband. I've also finished the Easy Folded Poncho by Churchmouse Yarns and Teas. Again, no picture. The socks are the ones I Kitchenered by lantern light during the storm, knit with Regia's Pairfect yarn. And the shawl is part of the Curious Handmade mystery knitalong. It's upside down in the photo, but that's the kind of thing that happens when you resort to having your dog model your knitted items.




It has been a treat to be able to get out for long walks again now that the weather has improved. A few days ago I was walking beside Frosst Creek (yes, it has two s's, it's not a typo), and there was an eerie mist seeping through the trees.




When I turned around to come home I was treated to this sight. So much drama in one walk!




My hikes up Teapot Hill have been curtailed due to snow and ice. I'm hoping the trail will be walkable in a week or two. But the roads are now clear of snow and ice, so I've resumed my walks to the lake. The cloud formations yesterday were incredible.

So that's February so far. I'm hoping the remainder of the month has a little less weather drama, and that by the end I will have some pictures of all the knitting I've been doing to share with you. In the meantime, how's February been treating you in your corner of the world?

Sunday, January 29, 2017

A Sunday Post

This blog has been very quiet for the month of January. I keep thinking I need to write another post, but then feel like I don't have anything to say. I suspect there are many of us who feel like this at the moment. Gobsmacked by what is happening around us. My blog is not about politics, or religion, or current events. It's meant to be a place that celebrates family, nature, crafting, gardening, and everyday life. So I hope you'll forgive me for this one small detour from the regularly scheduled content.

I am an immigrant. I came to this country over three decades ago. It was a relatively easy transition for me. I spoke the language, I had previously visited Canada many times on holidays, and I came from a country with a similar culture. Three of my children are immigrants. For two of them the transition was also easy since they were infants. Language was not a problem as crying pretty much sounds the same no matter where you are from.

But one of them didn't join our family until he was five, and that added a whole layer of complication. Imagine being whisked away on a plane with complete strangers. You've never flown before, you've never been outside of your country before, you don't speak a word of English, and the people you are with are complete strangers since you've only just met them the previous week. Not only do you not know them, they don't look anything like you. This was not an easy transition, but it was helped along by the fact that everyone involved cared, and did everything in their power to make it work. To make that new immigrant feel welcome. And safe. And loved.

My son-in-law is an immigrant. My daughter-in-law is an immigrant. It wasn't easy. They were older, they didn't speak the language, they came from cultures quite different than ours in Canada. It was a struggle for them and their families when they arrived. But they're okay. Actually, they are more than okay. They are wonderful people, and have fully assimilated into Canadian life.

So here's the thing. I wonder how the story would have turned out for me, my three adopted children, or my daughter-in-law and son-in-law if, instead of love and acceptance, we had experienced suspicion, fear, or hate upon our arrival in this country. All I can say is I'm so incredibly thankful that I'll never know the answer to that question.

Moving on...




I've jumped on the Stopover bandwagon. What a fast and fun knit! I did it in twelve days, and had I not stopped in the middle of it to finish up a pair of socks I might have completed it in under a week.




I'm still catching up on blogging about my Christmas knits. This is Ella's Bear In a Bunny Suit. I think it ended up looking more like a chipmunk in a bunny suit, but Ella's only a year and a half old, so I don't think she noticed.




This is Baa, knit for a friend of mine.




There were Flower Fairies and Leaf Sprites for Lucy and Nevaeh. And now I think I'm finally caught up with all my gift knitting!




Here's a glimpse of what's currently on the needles. I usually knit in the evenings, and Fergus is my knitting buddy. After some tummy rubs and ear scratches he settles in beside me and sleeps. The project on the right is going to be a skirt. Some day. Hopefully soon. The project on the left is going to be a Coast Salish inspired vest. Again, some day, hopefully soon.



We are in the midst of some lovely weather.



It's been so nice that the garlic I planted last fall are starting to grow. It's always an exciting discovery when I spot them. They are the first signs of life in my garden, and make me want to get out and start digging in the dirt again.

I hope your weekend has been a good one. And I hope you will forgive me for my digression from my usual content. It wasn't at all what I originally intended to write when I sat down at my computer.

Saturday, January 14, 2017

Deep Winter

I realize I am in the minority when I say this, but I love winter. I now live in a place that experiences very little winter, and I have to confess to missing snow covered trees, the crunching sound snow makes as you walk on it on a cold day, and the quiet stillness that happens after a big snowfall. So for me this winter, where we have actually experienced all of those things for the past month, has been a treat.




We have an indoor/outdoor weather gauge that not only tells you the temperature and weather forecast, it actually shows you what to expect. You can see my weather guy is bundled up in a scarf, toque and mittens, the cloud is dark black meaning we can expect a lot of precipitation, and there are snowflakes coming out of the cloud. Yippee! Snow instead of rain!




I always find January to be a bit of an odd month. I enjoy that tucked in feeling it gives me. It's the month, more than any other, I have the most success in slowing down, taking time to read the books and magazines that have been piling up, and spending time just being. Holiday preparations are in the past, and gardening and other active pursuits are in the future. I need to find a way to continue these moments of stillness throughout the year.




The weather might be cold (this week we've had overnight temperatures of -10 C), and the roads and paths are very icy, but I still make a point of spending time outdoors each day. I use Yak Trax to stay safe when I walk, and, possibly no surprise here, I have lots of woolly handknits to bundle up in to keep me warm.



Our holiday guests have all left, but that doesn't mean we haven't had daily visitors. The family of raccoons Jay rescued from the recycling bins last fall come by every day to say thanks. Fergus goes absolutely crazy when they show up, but that doesn't seem to deter them.


Flax by Tincanknits

Here are a few of my Christmas knits. I made Lucy and Ella matching Flax sweaters. This is such a great pattern! It's free, and there are two versions, one for worsted weight yarn, which is what I did, and the other for fingering weight.


Gramps by Tincanknits

Oliver's sweater is another Tincanknits pattern called Gramps. This might just be my favourite knit so far for my grandchildren. Those elbow patches, the pockets, the shawl collar... I'm pretty sure I'll be knitting Oliver another one in a bigger size at some point. The pipe and Prince Albert tobacco tin are not Oliver's. They belonged to my Grandpa. :-)

Our winter is forecast to come to an end Monday. Warm weather and rain will be returning. I will be putting my Yak tax and down jacket away, but I have this one last weekend of snow and ice and cold and all things Deep Winter to enjoy, and I intend to make the most of it. I'm hoping you are having a good weekend too, no matter what the weather!

Thursday, January 5, 2017

A Traditional Time

Here we are on the other side of the holidays, and I'm here to report that our family had a very traditional Christmas. Traditional, that is, in the sense that it was filled with the usual chaos, plus a bit of calamity thrown in for good measure.


The moment captured in this picture is what I now think of as the last civilized moment of the holiday. It was the evening of the 23rd, and everyone had just arrived. We had a "pie night," including chicken pot pie, quiche (two kinds, one vegetarian and the other with meat), and tourtiere. Rebekah and I had carefully planned each meal, breakfast, lunch and dinner, to feed sixteen people for five days, and the first night went exactly according to plan. Well, you know that Woody Allen quote? The one that says "If you want to make God laugh, tell him about your plans." Exactly. Disaster struck.

Our usual Christmas tradition is to have an appliance break down. This year the appliances held together, but the plumbing didn't. On Christmas Eve afternoon our kitchen sink became plugged. No amount of hot water, drain cleaner, or removal and inspection of pipes was able to remedy the problem. I'll spare you the details. I'm sure with some imagination you can picture a small cottage, sixteen people, and no ability to use the kitchen sink.

The good news was my brother had rented the cottage next door for him, my mom, and my two nieces. So we did have a sink and a place to prep food and wash dishes. It just meant making dozens and dozens of trips back and forth, through the snow and ice, to clean up from the last meal and prepare for the next one. It was exhausting.

But here's the really neat part of this story. Everyone pulled together and pitched in. My brother took charge of all dirty dishes, and loaded and reloaded the blue bin we were using to transport them next door to be cleaned, then he had to bring them all back in time to be used again at the next meal. Rebekah, my nieces Corinne and Danielle, and Alexandra were busy going back and forth too, helping me prep food for the next meal. And the people left at the cottage were in charge of watching over four young children, which was no small feat! Not only that, but after our celebrations were over and most people had left, the plumber came out. When it was time to write him a check for his services we were told that Karsten had asked for the invoice to be mailed to him. So many helping hands, and so much kindness. Who could ask for more?


I purposely put non-breakable ornaments on the bottom half of the tree. Lucy and Nevaeh had fun taking them off and giving them to my mom.


We managed to get outdoors for several walks.


Diana had purchased two sets of matching pyjamas for the kids. Trying to get a picture of all four of them was a bit like herding cats.


Nevaeh is modelling the mittens I knit for her. I'll have to save the rest of my Christmas knitting for another post or this will be way too long.


It was such a treat to have my nieces here with us. Ella and Lucy thought so too!


I'll leave you with one of my favourite pictures. If you look closely you'll see that Oliver has grabbed a handful of my mom's hair!

I hope your holiday season was memorable (in a good way), and here's wishing all of us a kind and calm 2017.

Thursday, December 22, 2016

Almost Ready



'Twas the night before Christmas guests arrived, and all through the fridge,
Not a square inch was left to put anything, not even a smidge;




The ornaments were placed high with great care,
In hopes that Ella and Oliver couldn't reach there;




Fergus and Jenny were nestled all snug in their crates:
While visions danced in their heads of food falling off plates...




Sorry, but that's as far as I can go with that! Things are a little crazy here as I get ready for everyone to arrive tomorrow. There will be sixteen of us in total for about five days (some are staying less time, some longer). Several other cottages have been rented, and I've purchased so much food that I've not only filled our fridge, I've also filled the fridge of one of those rental cottages.

I did manage to finish all my Christmas knitting. There was one particularly bleak moment two nights ago when I was knitting the wings on fairies and thought I might go a bit mad. I was knitting while watching The Sound of Music, which is one of my pre-Christmas traditions (watching the movie, not knitting wings). I was also texting with a knitting friend, whining about the wings. I took a picture of one of the fairies, minus its hat since those hadn't yet been knit, to send to her. It turned out to be the perfect screen shot, as I imagine the look on my face at that point pretty much matched this look on Maria's.




We've slipped past the solstice, and now Hanukkah, Christmas and a New Year are rapidly approaching. I hope that you have a wonderful season of celebration.  I will be back in the New Year with a report on all the gift knitting that has been happening here. Until then...




Happy Christmas to all, and to all a good night!

Friday, December 9, 2016

Frozen Friday

Brrr...! We are in the midst of an Arctic outflow, which has meant high winds and very cold temperatures. Today it is a bit milder and we have snow, which makes me very happy. Well, mostly happy. I was supposed to go to Victoria today to visit Lucy and Oliver, but had to cancel because of the forecast snow. I grew up in Northern Idaho, lived way up north in Fort St. John for six years, spent many years in the Kootenays, and most recently resided in Kamloops. All of these places experience Winter. I know how to drive on snowy roads and in extreme winter conditions. I don't like to do it, but will if I have to.

Which brings me to the Lower Mainland of BC. There's a reason it's the laughingstock of Canada when it comes to snow. All it takes to paralyze Vancouver is half an inch of the white stuff. Last week a bit of snow fell and a university completely shut down, two bridges had chunks of ice falling off the overhead structures, damaging dozens of cars, and the Sky Train had to shut down because the snow on the tracks kept setting off alarms. This is how I would expect a place like Hawaii or Costa Rica to function if they got hit by snow. Not somewhere in the Great White North. My writing skills aren't well honed enough to adequately describe what being on the road with the drivers here is like. But the fact that in spite of over four decades of accumulated experience driving in winter conditions I felt it necessary to cancel my trip to Victoria should give you an idea of just how bad it is.

It's been several weeks since I last wrote a post. That's not been for lack of things to blog about. I have been knitting at every available moment, and have many finished items, and a few soon to be finished ones, to show you. However, they are all Christmas gifts, so this post is going to be sans knitting. Instead you are going to get a bit of randomness, along with some pictures of winter settling in in my neck of the woods.



:: I was driving home at dusk this past week and when I saw this view of the sun going down just had to pull over and take a picture.

:: We had a power outage for a few hours yesterday. These happen with annoying frequency where we live. I cope better now that I have my Coleman stove, since I know I can still have a cup of tea even if there isn't any electricity.

:: When I was in Spokane in October I found a great deal on a pair of flannel-lined jeans at the Eddie Bauer outlet store. I've wanted a pair of flannel-lined jeans for ages, and had I known how warm and comfortable they are I would have bought some decades ago. I must admit that due to the extra thickness they do make my legs look a bit like tree trunks, but at least they are warm tree trunks.




:: Rebekah and I got together last week to plan the food for Christmas. Ella's favourite "toy" is a cardboard box that has a string attached. She knows Nana is a soft touch, and will pull her around endlessly. Or until I get dizzy and need to sit down for a bit.

:: If you are in the market for some good books for children I highly recommend the Orange Marmalade blog. She does wonderful reviews of children's books, and I've discovered many a great book through her blog.




:: I have no idea what these three were looking at. I was sitting on the window seat behind them, knitting away on Christmas gifts, and happened to look down and see them all staring intently ahead.




:: I know I show a lot of pictures of our mountains, but it seems like they are constantly changing.




:: I know I also show probably way too many pictures of the lake, but it also changes dramatically with each season. Leading up to Christmas the residents at Lindell beach put a tree up on one of the docks, all strung with lights. I'll have to see if I can get a picture of it in the evening when it's all lit up.




:: The Arctic outflow has painted the beach with ice. I walked down a couple days ago to get some pictures of the ice formations for my blog, but it was so cold my phone shut down. So yesterday I drove down, and placed my phone inside one of the thrummed mittens I made a few years ago. It kept it toasty warm, and I would quickly pull it out, take a picture, then stuff it back into the mitten until I was ready to use it again.

:: I'm sure by now most of you will have seen this Christmas video out of Poland, but just in case you might have missed it here's a link. Warning. You might want to grab a tissue before viewing.

:: I'm not even close to being ready for the holidays, and felt a bit panicked this morning when I realized that two weeks from today there will be fourteen people arriving. I haven't done any baking, there's all that unfinished knitting, and I need to start stockpiling food. Yikes! How about you? Are your preparations going well? And am I the only one madly trying to finish making gifts?

Sunday, November 20, 2016

A Weekend Away

I've just returned from a mini-holiday. I journeyed to Port Townsend, Washington to spend a few days with Kath and Melissa, who you will have met in previous blog posts about my walks in Wales and Ireland. In one of those crazy knitter moments, just three days before I left I decided to knit something for Kath's granddaughter. That meant that all my free moments leading up to my get-away were spent madly knitting away, trying to finish the project. Late Wednesday night I cast off the last of the items, and managed to take these pictures early Thursday morning before I headed south.



Introducing Leaf Fairy and Wood Sprite, knit from a pattern by Susan B. Anderson. It was a great way to use up bits of leftover yarn from the stash. The pattern was easy to follow and fun to knit. I'm fairly certain more of these will be knit before Christmas!

I had never been to Port Townsend before, and I have to say I was impressed by this quaint little community. We had a great time looking through the shops that line the main street, and the setting right by the water is spectacular. I think for the three of us though, getting out of town and into nature is what we like the most.




Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge was amazing. These pictures were taken on the Dungeness Spit, which extends for five miles. We didn't have time to walk the whole distance, but managed to make it quite a ways down the narrow band of sand. When you are on the spit you are only allowed to walk on one side. The other side is for the resident bird population.




We journeyed on to the Olympic National Park, and did a short hike in to Marymere Falls.




The falls was near Crescent Lake. It was a spectacular setting, and we were there as the sun was going down, which added to the cozy feel of the lodge. I think I could have curled up in front of that fireplace and spent the whole winter there, a book on one side of me and my knitting on the other.